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, for the most part, dodging hurricane irene. >> do you expect that this time around? >> no, i don't. at this think we're probably already further along in this storm than we were with irene. the ocean is angry right now. and we're going to see a storm surge. >> reporter: a surge that could raise sea level up to eight feet above normal, enough to flood much of this city. police are urging but not forcing people in the evacuation zone to leave. most here are heeding their advice. the boardwalk is all but abandoned. but some like brian have decided to stay. >> got everything pretty well situated, bunkered down, generator is ready to rock. hang out, ride it out, road out irene last year, wasn't that bad. >> reporter: but the experts say this storm could be much worse than irene. here in maryland and farther up the coast including in new jersey. and that's where elaine quijano is, elaine? >> reporter: well, chip, we're in the town of bayhead, new jersey, which is especially vulnerable it sits just ten feet above sea level and like other coastal communities residents here have been orde
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
the street. a lot of people after hurricane irene said they decided to stay put. what you see in the distance is a new york city bus that has been converted into a hurricane shelter transport. there's 72 hurricane shelters set up throughout new york city. so far at last check, there were only about 1,100 people staying inside of them. mandatory evacuations were in place for hurricane irene but that storm petered out. this, of course, expected to be much worse. so many people buying generators, water, extra food, deciding to stick it out. the problem with all of that is in the past four hours that we've been here, conditions have deteriorated quickly. so when people notice that something could really be wrong, they may not have a chance to get out safely. veronica. >> you can hear the wind picking up. tracie strahan of wnbc, thank you. >>> moments ago president obama canceled a campaign appearance in florida in order to get back to the white house sooner to monitor the storm. nbc's tracie potts has the latest for us from washington. tracie, what's going on? >> reporter: veronica, as you can se
's lay them out. we start with the storm surge. in irene at battery park which is where i am tonight, we had three to six feet. we're expecting four to eight feet with this storm here and down the jersey shore as well. that will be higher than what they dealt with during irene. so plan on similar scenarios there. then look at the rainfall. huge areas of two inches plus, four inches plus. locally ten inches in spots in parts of new jersey and the chesapeake bay. if you remember the state of new jersey was one of those heavily fladed flooded back here with irene. then snowfall. to add insult to injury, west virginia, ohio, maryland, pennsylvania and parts of virginia could get 50 inches of snow with this. add all these ingredients together, that means power outages, some which will last for weeks. pennsylvania, new york, west virginia, an 800-mile-wide damage path with this. on the 108th anniversary of the opening of the subway system in new york, we're hoping that in 48 hours parts of it won't be under water. >> places are holding their breath tonight. jim cantore in lower manhattan for u
through like katrina or like irene? >> every storm is different, as i said. we have their own hazards. irene was a storm that moved parallel to the coast with most of the heaviest weather to the right so there were a lot of folks very close to the center in new jersey, for example, that didn't really know that there was a lot going on. this storm instead, first of all, it's much larger than irene. it's coming directly at the coast instead of parallelling it. the effects are spanning hundreds and hundreds of miles, much more so than irene. >> ifill: this storm is hovering with lots of rain centered over one area. how many days do you expect we'll be coping with the fallout from all of that? >> well, i think that it's going to take until wednesday before conditions really significantly improve so that people can get back and start looking at what happened. tomorrow it's still going to be a bad day because the system is going to slow down once it gets towards pennsylvania. it will weaken, but it's going to take a long time for this system to wind down. >> ifill: james franklin of the nat
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: but the streets are crackling not with panic, but with a sort of upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? what do you want to do? panic? we're new yorkers. >> reporter: hard not to enjoy her spirit. agree with her or not. one last bit of news from new york, david. the new york stock exchange announcing late today that they will be closed tomorrow, however, people will still be able to trade stocks online electronically. back to you. >> she was a class
are in pretty bad trouble. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines as the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: the streets are crackling not with panic but with with an upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? >> reporter: got to admire her spirit. one piece of breaking news from here in new york. we just learned that the stock market will be closed tomorrow. there were concerns if they tried to stay open, they might lose power during the course of the day. back to you. >> and a few people over your shoulder still getting into the subway. dan harri
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
of the restaurant here. he was telling us that basically it was highest he had ever seen. he was here for irene last year. he has been with the restaurant for about a decade here at battery gardens. saying again it was the most water he had ever seen come up. he seas if it gets to be the 11-foot level, melissa, that will be trouble. he will predicts that will go above the two levels of terrace he has and begin to seep into his restaurant there. back to you. melissa: wow, robert gray, down at battery, normally one of the most beautiful places in manhattan at the very southern tip. thanks so much for that report. >>> the storm expected to hit an area responsible for 6.5% of the country's refining capacity. does that mean gas prices are about a spike? stock exchanges shuttered today and tomorrow. what will happen when trading starts again? price futures group senior market analyst phil flynn has been following all the stories for us. i want to ask you, philings because you're at cme. s&p futures will open about an hour from now. investor sentiment pent up because markets closed today and tomorrow. what
after hurricane irene which left people without power in that state for days. martha. martha: we'll find out what lessons were learned from irene at the same time as this last year. so many places out of power for so many days. we'll see whether or not we're in better shape this time around. airports across the northeast have been brought to a virtual stand still. that is causing a ripple effect for travelers around the country. airports across the new york city area are open. but carriers canceled 7600 flights. basically you're not going anywhere in and out of this area today and down to d.c. as well in many cases. some airlines added flights out of the northeast. so they can move their planes off the ground and out of the storm's path to other areas around the country. all of this adds to the travel nightmare and indeed amtrak as well is suspending their train service across the region. so folks, where you are is where you're going to sty for the time-being. the storm is shutting down the new york stock exchange. the last time that happened was almost 30 years ago. during hurricane glo
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
before hurricane irene, chris christie told people in no uncertain terms and i will quote him here, get the hell outfit beach. my question to you, are people heeding his message to get out and get to safer ground? >> reporter: you know, they are. and you may remember, he caught some criticism for using those strong words last year after what people along the immediate jersey shore felt was an overreaction. certainly after irene's disaster, turned out to be a wise choice, especially for those living along the immediately shoreline. here in asbury park and up and down the northern coastline of new jersey, they have certainly heeded his warning. here's a look at the surf that continues to pour in. the tide is actually receding now. but i've only seen it go down maybe five, ten feet in the last 20 minutes because the actual surge continues to push water over what should be dry, sandy beach here. but obviously that's not the case. so i think throughout the afternoon, even though the tide is going down, we're going to see it hold where it is. and when high tide comes again later on tonight ar
will likely exceed the $12 billion to $16 billion from hurricane irene which battered the northeast in august of 2011 says a chief economist. and an economics professor at smith ity of maryland school of business estimates it will result in about $35 billion to $45 billion total losses. and another company projects $10 billion to $20 billion of damage about half insured. property damage will be repaired and lost economic output will be adjust set by other increased activity as residents prepare for the hurricane. and here is another story about economic impact from "wall street journal." losses may exceed those of the 2011 storm. airlines and shippers expect an extended disruption. will cost them millions of dollars and leave thousands of fliers and goods stranded. airlines will cancel a total more than 14,600 flights as monday and more than the roughly 10,000 canceled due to hurricane irene in 2011. irene comes united continental holdings about $40 million in revenue. delta airlines said hurricane irene forced it to cancel about 2,200 flights costing $15 million in profits. delta has cancele
, than last year's hurricane irene. with winds near 80 miles an hour, right now hurricane sandy is moving north along the eastern seaboard, already impacting portions of florida and georgia. mary thompson is tracking preparations ahead of the big storm. >> it's already been dubbed frankenstorm over the halloween horror story at lowe's. the east coast of course bracing for a storm with potential to do billions in damage. the latest update from noaa says heavy rains and flooding is forecast in the mid-atlantic states but high winds could be felt from the carolinas all the way up through new england. corporate america's prepping to serve both customers and protect its employees in light of this storm. at lowe's, a 24-hour command center tracks the storm while it shipped generators, batteries, chainsaws and other items in high demand after the storm to northeast markets expected to be impacted by sandy. as for the power provider, citi noting four with big exposure to the mid-atlantic and pennsylvania areas where the heaviest rains and flooding are forecast. banks saying any earnings risks for
as washington state. >> memories of hurricane irene the left billions in damage to have people determined not to get caught off guard. virginia and maryland the party declared states of emergency. people are being told to prepare for the worst. >> governor o'malley has already signed an executive order declaring a state of emergency in maryland. it gives the state flexibility and calling up the maryland national guard. local jurisdictions have been in planning meetings all day. >> storm preparedness starts at home. this san derrin, for example, is for fell's point residents -- this sand dune, for example, is for fell's point residents. hurricane sandy, the super storm, it has lots of names, but one devastating consequence depending on which path it takes. >> we still do not know what the storm is going to do. we know that it is coming to baltimore county. >> the concern that we have about this particular event is the duration of it which would continue through thursday. >> the baltimore county emergency operations center opens sunday. emergency equipment have been inspected. officials wil
seen it. worse than irene. this is a frustrating situation to him. it has all to do with underground infrastructure. i shouldn't say only because that would be a record breaking storm surge. we had one that was higher than that. that's the main reason that it will take so long. >> some of those areas deliberately shut down power out of precaution. explain what happened. >> it is convenient because you don't have wires aboveground. but during a flooding situation that can spell big problems and it did. so they will shut down some of the stations as a precautionary measure and saeal them off so they don't get the corrosive salt water in there. they judged it on the past historic storms and built it higher than that. that's exactly what sandy brought them. so an unprecedented event and something that really they didn't plan for. i asked them are you going to look into upgrading that? that would cost serious dollars but he did acknowledge, that's a question that certainly has to be discussed. >> i know you have spoken with a lot of new yorkers. how are they reacting? especially the lower
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 220 (some duplicates have been removed)